The Surprising 9.3×62 Rifle Cartridge

The Surprising 9.3×62 Rifle Cartridge

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Who is Ron Spomer
For 44 years I’ve had the good fortune to photograph and write about my passion – the outdoor life. Wild creatures and wild places have always stirred me – from the first flushing pheasant that frightened me out of my socks in grandpa’s cornfield to the last whitetail that dismissed me with a wag of its tail. In my attempts to connect with this natural wonder, to become an integral part of our ecosystem and capture a bit of its mystery, I’ve photographed, hiked, hunted, birded, and fished across much of this planet. I’ve seen the beauty that everyone should see, survived adventures that everyone should experience. I may not have climbed the highest mountains, canoed the wildest rivers, caught the largest fish or shot the biggest bucks, but I’ve tried. Perhaps you have, too. And that’s the essential thing. Being out there, an active participant in our outdoor world.

Produced by: Red 11 Media

50 Comments

  1. TWP61 on November 15, 2021 at 8:15 pm

    Great cartridge. I prefer the 9.3 x 64 Brenneke. It is a superior cartridge to the 9.3 x 62. Also a German cartridge from 1910. Truly a big game power house.



  2. John Murdoch on November 15, 2021 at 8:16 pm

    Fantastic plains game cartridge. I shot everything from warthog to Eland with it.



  3. Christopher Eaves on November 15, 2021 at 8:17 pm

    Hey Ron, I love your videos. Would you do a video on the Winchester 338 magnum?



  4. Charles Pilkington on November 15, 2021 at 8:18 pm

    Have you covered the German cartridge 7.92×63?



  5. Comented onakeyboard on November 15, 2021 at 8:19 pm

    Realy good pronounciation (only the ch in sprechen is pronounced slightly more like sch)👍



  6. Jack McLane on November 15, 2021 at 8:19 pm

    It’s a very popular choice with german hunters… while being totally overpowered for everything we have here. Probably because of that.



  7. Paul on November 15, 2021 at 8:21 pm

    Looks like my Whelen 😍



  8. RatherBeFishing on November 15, 2021 at 8:21 pm

    Great review!
    I’ve got one in a fairly light Mauser 96 with an Aimpoint sight. Finally shot an elk with it this year and was very impressed with the lack of meat damage despite a complete pass through that hit one shoulder. Was using the 270 gr Speer Hot-Cor and will continue to do so.



  9. James Wasilchen on November 15, 2021 at 8:22 pm

    I’m not about mysticism associated with certain cartridges. I’m about the size of the case, the diameter and weight of the bullet, and the amount of powder that can be stuffed into that case. Yet I too tend to like certain cartridges for nostalgic reasons.



  10. Mikkel Kroeyer on November 15, 2021 at 8:22 pm

    I load for my Schultz Larsen chambered in 9.3×62 using Barnes TSX 250 grs. My load sent those bullets with 800 m/s. It is a hotter load but I have been using it for years without any problems. I have short a lot of roe deers, wild boars and mooses with this combination.

    Recently I have gotten the 8x57is in a lighter rifle as the one I uses when being a dog handler. There is something to these old ones that is hard to beat.



  11. Matthew Selge on November 15, 2021 at 8:22 pm

    Roughly 95% the frontal area, velocity and bullet weight of a .375 H&H (comparing the standard 286 grain 9.3 to the 300 grain .375). The 9.3 produces roughly 88% the muzzle energy (personal opinion: energy is an overrated metric when discussing terminal performance). The 9.3 does so in a lighter, shorter, package that produces about 25-30 percent less recoil and offers 2 additional rounds. A few years back, I shot a buffalo that weighed about 1 ton on the hoof and the 9.3 dropped it in its tracks. Phil Shoemaker has written on this cartridge. As a 9.3 owner, I can say that buying one over a .375 is one of the best decisions I have ever made. There is no noted difference in effect when compared to the .375 (which is about 5% more powerful) and the 9.3 offers all the aforementioned benefits.



  12. Politicallyincorrect Andproudofthis on November 15, 2021 at 8:23 pm

    I confirm of course Blaser propose it …I have two in this great caliber : one Pro with 20” barrel and one Attaché (Diplomat) with 23” barrel.



  13. Kalli M on November 15, 2021 at 8:24 pm

    ja, ich spreche deutsch 🙂 As a German Master Craftsman Gunsmith (since 2014 in Canada) I love the 9.3×62 but soon I want to build my own 9.3×64 from my fathers old hunting Mauser 98 in Caliber 7×64. The 9.3×64 can be loaded from soft to hard without loosing accuraticy and is than more versatile than the 9.2×62.
    I need a new barrel, have to modify the bolt and the internal magazine, then the Suhler hook-in mount – that’s it. I don’t need the 7×64 – I have my father preferred DWM Mauser in 30-06 with an additional Barrel in 22. mag on the top (w. own trigger system, safety etc.) An extreme rare Rifle combination, made 1979 from my apprenticeship boss in Germany Mr. Erwin Bender.



  14. Nate Osborn on November 15, 2021 at 8:25 pm

    Was on the NH Canada boarder. Dropped a 1400 lbs moose with one shot from my Rem 700 in 35 whelen. Factor ammo. Shot landed about 1.2-1.3 foot below the spine above the front leg. The moose never made it a foot. It dropped where it stood and sold me on 35 whelen. This was a “down grade” from my 375 H&H. But boy was it worth it. Much more control Andy follow up shot was ready a bit faster and not even needed. 8 deer and 20+ hogs now on 35 whelen. It’s my go to hunting rifle.



  15. FearsomeBookling on November 15, 2021 at 8:26 pm

    9.3×62 works well with non-lead ammunition. I think that will increase popularity even more.



  16. Yukon Freightworks Canoe Manzo on November 15, 2021 at 8:28 pm

    I’ve shot too many moose and caribou with 300 grainers from the ole 9.3, to ever consider lugging a heavy 375 by snow shoe or up elevation by foot. Even at rare instances where longer shots were taken at 400 and 500 yds,the ole nine three prevailed. Talk to ME when you want to get a good run-down on the ole nine three.



  17. 17_Jäger on November 15, 2021 at 8:28 pm

    "Guten Tag, ich übernehme nun diese Kommentarsektion im Namen der BRD.
    Vielen Dank für ihre Aufmerksamkeit meine sehr verehrten Damen und Herren."

    And now back to the video, Iam thinking about buying a 9,3×62 rifle



  18. EdQ76 on November 15, 2021 at 8:28 pm

    A popular caliber here in Germany for everything from Roe Deer to Stag up to 200sh yards



  19. Bob Wills on November 15, 2021 at 8:28 pm

    The poor mans 375 HandH !!!



  20. h n angell on November 15, 2021 at 8:29 pm

    I teach ballistics at the Professional Hunting School in East Cape Province in South Africa. (I live near Seattle, WA.) I only have three 9.3×62 rifles but am always looking for more. This video is ‘letting the cat out of the bag’ of the unique value of the 9.3×62 (or 9.3x74R in double rifles). I find it can do ANYTHING a .375H&H can with a lighter rifle and less recoil. The secret (just like the .30-’06 cartridge) is to pick the right weight/form bullet for the job. Kevin ‘Doctari’ Roberts (a large animal vet) has one with 650+ successful Cape Buffalo kills to the rifle. Proper shot placement is the key. Just like the flexibility of the .30-’06, the 9.3×62 cartridge can use 200, 235, 250, 270, 275, 286, 300, and 320 gn bullets. Match the bullet to the job! I normally carry the 286 round nose in the chamber and a 250 or 235 gn spitzer in the magazine in case of a close up surprise (and just chuck it out if I need a longer shot at plains game). In a pinch the 9.3×62 can be made from .30-’06 brass!



  21. Greene Fieldmann on November 15, 2021 at 8:29 pm

    Tell me you’re American without telling me you’re American:



  22. Lone Wolf Gardening on November 15, 2021 at 8:31 pm

    Ich liebe deutsche Patronen.



  23. Anders Jensen Svemark on November 15, 2021 at 8:31 pm

    Here in Sweden it is very popular caliber on moose and bear. My Tikka T3 Light in 9,3×62 weight 8 pounds



  24. Johan Runfeldt on November 15, 2021 at 8:37 pm

    9,3×62 had a predecessor called 9,3×57, which basically was a 8×57 necked up to 9,3mm. It didn’t launch the bullet very fast, so in Sweden for instance, it got the nickname "potato-thrower".



  25. hugtango on November 15, 2021 at 8:38 pm

    and there is as well the 9.3×64 but it kicks more than the 9.3×62.



  26. Russell Jackson on November 15, 2021 at 8:38 pm

    Right on



  27. Elvir Redzepovic on November 15, 2021 at 8:38 pm

    "Patrons" ? Is that new name for us that keep beggars like you alive ?



  28. Ray Tribble on November 15, 2021 at 8:40 pm

    Great video! I built a 9.3X62mm on a GEW 98 action with a 26” stainless #4 barrel 6 years ago. It is a stunning elk cartridge and works equally well on black bear and deer.
    I stick to the 286 grain Hornady bullets, but it performs well out to 300 yards or so.
    It is one of my favorite rounds!



  29. Petra Meyer on November 15, 2021 at 8:40 pm

    Now please a video about the BIG German Afrika cartridge, the 9.3x74R.



  30. Eiflerisch on November 15, 2021 at 8:40 pm

    Again great Video, thank you Sir! Greetings from Germany and "Waidmannsheil" (Ancient salut of the German Hunters)



  31. BMXrider915 on November 15, 2021 at 8:40 pm

    This is my favorite Eland cartridge and Ruger chambers one in there Hawkeye African, now it is a limited edition rifle so you can only buy them used now.



  32. Hoffi on November 15, 2021 at 8:41 pm

    Browning bar mk3 in 9.3×62



  33. ON on November 15, 2021 at 8:41 pm

    Thanks for the video. I recently inherited a Swedish Husqvarna 649 (M98 action) chambered in 9,3×62 from -47. Good thing about these old rifles is that they often havent seen much range use because of the recoil and cost of ammunition. Sadly the stocks on theese Husqvarnas are infamous for not being able to handle the recoil and breaking. I put a Boyds stock on it and now its usuable again but its also a bit too light. I really like it and its definitley a keeper.



  34. elpmettsol on November 15, 2021 at 8:43 pm

    I can shoot a 30/06 with a 220 gr bullet all day. But stuff like the 300 RUM or similar, going through a box would be the exception vs the norm. I have a feeling this caliber would be another exception with a day on the bench.



  35. TXLorenzo on November 15, 2021 at 8:45 pm

    The 9,3 is comparable to the 35 Whelen. It is a great caliber, but ammo is not so easy to find in the states. The recoil is not bad, basically a steady push and not snappy.



  36. Tankmeister on November 15, 2021 at 8:50 pm

    The biggest mistake is trying to convert metric to imperial
    Inch is inch
    Mm is mm



  37. NEMANJA JANJATOVIC on November 15, 2021 at 8:51 pm

    My favorite caliber.



  38. Kim Fagerström on November 15, 2021 at 8:51 pm

    Nice caliber for animals from Roedeer to moose. And versitaile for smaller animal you can use 220 Grain bullets and for the biggest animals you can find 300 Grain bullets. But most bullets are in the 250 to 286 grs range. I Love My 9,3×62 .



  39. Frederik R. on November 15, 2021 at 8:55 pm

    As a german hunter I’m thinking, "9.3×62 is an obscure cartridge?". It is a popular round for hunting hogs and red deer here in germany, even if a lot of people think it is over powered for this purpose.



  40. Jonas F on November 15, 2021 at 8:55 pm

    9,3×62 is a quite common hunting calibre here in Sweden. Excellent for moose, wild bore and bear!



  41. Spruce Bug on November 15, 2021 at 8:56 pm

    Zastava chambers the M70 LK in 9.3×62. I use that rifle for black bear, deer, and moose once i draw a tag.



  42. Doug Feuge on November 15, 2021 at 9:01 pm

    Bought mine this year. Ruger M77.



  43. Jose Vicente Alcocer on November 15, 2021 at 9:03 pm

    Ese cartucho es muy conocido y usado en Europa.



  44. Johan Larsson on November 15, 2021 at 9:04 pm

    The 9.3×62 is quite popular for wildboar, moose and bear here in sweden



  45. Johan Andersson on November 15, 2021 at 9:04 pm

    .The hornady 9,3×62 GMX 250gr factory load works beautyfully in my Husquvarna 1640. I shot everything from roe deer to moose with it, and it works perfekt!



  46. Тёмный лес on November 15, 2021 at 9:04 pm

    Спасибо вам! Было интересно слушать! У нас в России этот калибр пользуется спросом. Конечно самые популярные у наших охотников 308 и 30-06, но 9,3 много у кого есть, ибо леса сильно густые, далеко стрелять нам не приходится, чаще всего стреляешь метров 50, зато важнее сразу остановить зверя. Фины тоже любят этот калибр.



  47. Welcome to the Gun Show SA on November 15, 2021 at 9:08 pm

    Mine has proven a magnificent bushveld caliber capable of taking anything that walks in a pretty light rifle that isn’t too much for Impala sized game.



  48. 1776 on November 15, 2021 at 9:10 pm

    Don’t forget that Lipseys did a wonderful run of Ruger Hawkeye African rifle in it. It is a great round. I have little to no love for all the modern stuff. Give me a hundred yr old cartridge that has proven itself !!! Also remember for the first 40 or so yrs of its life IRON SIGHTS ruled the day. So a solid performer out to 250 yds was king !!!



  49. giacomo dal monte on November 15, 2021 at 9:13 pm

    Its a very common cartridge here in Italy, all boar hunters here love it.



  50. louie lindenmayer on November 15, 2021 at 9:14 pm

    Just a follow-up: got a 250gr gas-check mold and after a couple coats of Hi-Tek, the marauding squirrels are in trouble! A less expensive way to get trigger time with this gun.